WHAT NOVELISTS CAN TEACH YOU ABOUT
WRITING BETTER COPY

Over the years I’ve worked for several clients in the, “writing advice” niche.

In this capacity I mostly wrote copy but also worked on several courses.

This experience taught me a lot about writing.

You see, one of the first steps when planning your novel is coming up with a theme. In case you don’t know, the theme of a novel is the idea behind your story. You could also describe it as the meaning or overall feeling of your book. The theme provides an umbrella under which your characters operate and also a direction in which the plot moves. This is important because without a theme you have no story.

Themes are also useful when writing copy.

In fact, basing copy around a theme is critical if you’re writing things like sales letters.

You need to have some general overarching idea behind your copy.

Ideally this should relate to your markets wants, needs, desires, or problems.

The theme should be an idea which appeals to buyers and helps to sell them.

If you’re selling a trading course your theme could be escaping the rat race.

With diets it could be changing people’s perceptions of you.

A cryptocurrency product might have the idea of getting rich quickly.

The bottom line is that all copy should be based around some type of theme.

Your theme provides a framework for the copy, defines what you say…

…and also creates a general direction for the copy to move in.

Until next time.

Cheers,

Alastair Walton

ITALIAN ECONOMIST REVEALS LITTLE KNOWN
SECRET FOR BOOSTING SALES

Success in business is far simpler than most people think:

All you really have to do is find a red hot market and sell to them over and over again.

One way to do this is with the 80/20 rule.

You see, in 1906 Italian economist Vilfredo Pareto discovered something astounding.

What he found was that 80% of the land in Italy was owned by 20% of the population.

He called this the 80/20 rule and it’s something that is replicated in almost all aspects of life.

A good example is business.

If you look at your business, you’ll probably find that 20% of your customers account for 80% of your revenues. Within this 20% the rule also exists i.e. 20% of that group will represent 80% of your sales. If you do the math, this means that 4% of your customers are responsible for an incredible 64% of all sales.

So what’s the point?

The point is that if you want to dramatically raise your profits…

…you need to laser target this top 4% and also find more people who fit into this category.

One way you can do this is by looking at what characteristics this group shares.

What do they have in common in terms of age, location, education, or hobbies? Also look at things like the types of products or services they’re interested in, and how they found you or what advertising channel they came in from.

Once you have this information your job is to find similar people…

…and sell to them like crazy.

More tomorrow.

Cheers,

Alastair Walton

3 THINGS YOU MUST DO WHEN CREATING A LEAD MAGNET

With a killer lead magnet it’s possible to build your list in no time at all.

On the other hand, a poor lead magnet can result in a conversion rate of zero…

…plus a whole lot of wasted time and effort.

This is why you need to think hard before doing anything. To get you started, here are three steps for strategically creating a lead magnet that converts visitors into customers.

1. Pinpoint your target audience

Who exactly are you trying to attract?

The answer shouldn’t be, “everyone.”

You want to choose a specific market and then laser target that market. Think of it this way: like a real magnet, your lead magnet should both attract and repel. This means you want to focus on your ideal customer, not just anyone. After all, trying to sell someone who isn’t qualified is almost pointless.  

2. Come up with an ultra-compelling offer

You need to come up with an offer that your prospect absolutely cannot refuse.

It should be so compelling that they immediately enter their email address.

What’s more, most people know that if they sign up you’re going to send them marketing messages. This often puts them off (even if they can unsubscribe). This means your offer has to be compelling enough to overcome this objection. A good way to do this is to think of something that helps to solve the prospects problems. You can also write down a list of common customer questions, then brainstorm ideas for a lead magnet that answers those questions.

3. Have your follow up sequence in place

Your lead magnet is only one half of the equation.

Your follow up sequence is the other.

Remember, most people won’t buy the first time they encounter your product. This means you need to have a follow up sequence. Ultimately your lead magnet should guide people toward the product or service you’re selling. At the same time you need to educate customers, provide the information needed to buy, and take into account where they are in the buying journey.

More tomorrow:

Cheers,

Alastair Walton