SHOULD COPYWRITERS HAVE A BLOG?

Should copywriters have a blog?

The answer is YES.

In fact, blogging is one of your most powerful marketing tools.

You see, here’s something you need realize:

Most copywriters get hung up on having samples. But I’m not really a big believer in this. Most of the time clients don’t even read them. Also, if you’ve been working a while you probably have dozens or even hundreds samples. Eventually updating and maintaining your sample file becomes a massive chore.

The solution to these problems is your blog.

Why?

Because everything you write is a sample.

So instead of giving clients examples of your work simply send them to your blog.

For copywriters this is almost too perfect. Blogging gives you the opportunity to demonstrate your knowledge of marketing and persuasion. Every post you write allows you to show off your skills and prove that you know what you’re doing.

The caveat is that you have to make an effort.

You have to write each post as if you were being paid a thousand dollars.

As if someone had a gun to your head and you had to convince them to hire you.

Blogging also has other benefits. It’s a great way hone your skills and also gives you something to do when you don’t have client work. If you’re not busy just write a couple of blog posts – it’s better than sitting around all day and doing nothing.

The last step is to set up an email list.

This will also help you market to prospective clients.

It doesn’t have to take any extra work.

Just send them the blog posts you’ve already written.

Cheers,

Alastair Walton

BIG TIP FOR ASPIRING COPYWRITERS

If you’re an aspiring copywriter here’s a BIG tip:

When I first started out I spent 90% of my time chasing clients.

As you can imagine this was extremely stressful and even when I found work I made very little money.

But then I got smart and started doing things differently.

And before I knew it I had more high quality clients than I could handle.

What did I do?

It might sound counterintuitive but I realized most copywriters DON’T actually write copy.

What most of them actually do is sell copywriting courses.

There’s a good reason for this:

(Besides making money.)

You see, when most business owners realize they need copy they can do one of two things.

They can hire a copywriter or learn how to write it themselves.

That’s where you come in to sell them an instructional product or two. The trick is that if your product is good they might just decide to hire you instead. At which point you’ve created a HIGHLY qualified prospect…

…with more than enough money to spend on your services.

THIS is how you find dream clients.

Bottom line:

Don’t waste your time chasing bums.

Get clients to come to you instead.

Cheers,

Alastair Walton

SHOULD YOU DO TRIAL JOBS?

Should copywriters do trial jobs?

Every now and again I get asked about this:

The answer is yes and no and it really depends on who you’re dealing with. You see, a lot of people use, “Trial jobs” as a way to get work done for nothing. If you ask ten prospective writers for a blog post, you could end up with five great posts (And do it without having to pay a cent for them.)

In many cases this is obviously what’s being done.

On the other hand, I landed some of my biggest clients by doing trial jobs.

Sometimes the client has no malicious intent and simply wants to know what you’re capable of.

Many times it’s a test to see if you’re willing to follow instructions.

So what it really comes down to is experience and being able to sniff out shady people.

It’s also about the job. Depending on what’s being offered it might be worth your while to make an effort. After all, you really have nothing to lose but your time. If you don’t get the job you can chalk it down to experience. That being said, make sure you don’t spend too much time on the task. Anything that takes more than an hour or two isn’t worth it.

If you’re still uncertain ask them to pay a nominal fee upfront.

This will help to weed out people who aren’t serious.

The best thing you can do is avoid putting yourself in this position.

You want to be getting so many offers you can pick and choose the best ones.

You also want such a good reputation that no would dare ask you to do trial work.

(It also helps if you skip clients altogether and focus on selling your own products.)

Cheers,

Alastair Walton