10 OBVIOUS MISTAKES PEOPLE MAKE WHEN WRITING SALES LETTERS

Here are 10 of the worst mistakes people make when writing sales letters:

1. Bad headline.   

Your headline is the most important part of the sales letter. It should immediately attract attention and communicate the biggest benefit of your product or service.

2. Talking about themselves too much.

People don’t care about you or how long you’ve been in business. Talk about THEM and the benefits they will get out of your product.

3. Exaggerated claims.

Don’t make claims which seem outrageous. They feel untrue and you’ll lose credibility this way.

4. What’s in it for them?

Prospects have to know, “What’s in it for them” i.e. what benefits are they going to get from your product.

5. The offer is too confusing.

Your sales letter needs to make a really clear, easily understandable offer. When people are confused about what you’re selling they often do nothing.

6. Copy is too short.

Remember, the more you tell the more you sell. So include every benefit and mention everything you can about your products.

7. Use more subheads.

Using long paragraphs without subheads makes your copy harder to read. You need to have at least two or three subheads per page. Also make sure to keep your paragraphs and sentences short.

8. No testimonials.

Testimonials from happy customers should be included in every letter. These help to build your credibility.

9. No money back guarantee.

A money back guarantee will significantly increase sales and lower refunds. Not only that, the longer your refund the better. A 30 day refund is more effective than a 10 day.

10. No P.S.

The P.S. is often the second most read part of any sales letter. Never skip it!

Follow these tips and you sales will increase dramatically…

Cheers,

Alastair Walton

SHOULD YOU DO TRIAL JOBS?

Should copywriters do trial jobs?

Every now and again I get asked about this:

The answer is yes and no and it really depends on who you’re dealing with. You see, a lot of people use, “Trial jobs” as a way to get work done for nothing. If you ask ten prospective writers for a blog post, you could end up with five great posts (And do it without having to pay a cent for them.)

In many cases this is obviously what’s being done.

On the other hand, I landed some of my biggest clients by doing trial jobs.

Sometimes the client has no malicious intent and simply wants to know what you’re capable of.

Many times it’s a test to see if you’re willing to follow instructions.

So what it really comes down to is experience and being able to sniff out shady people.

It’s also about the job. Depending on what’s being offered it might be worth your while to make an effort. After all, you really have nothing to lose but your time. If you don’t get the job you can chalk it down to experience. That being said, make sure you don’t spend too much time on the task. Anything that takes more than an hour or two isn’t worth it.

If you’re still uncertain ask them to pay a nominal fee upfront.

This will help to weed out people who aren’t serious.

The best thing you can do is avoid putting yourself in this position.

You want to be getting so many offers you can pick and choose the best ones.

You also want such a good reputation that no would dare ask you to do trial work.

(It also helps if you skip clients altogether and focus on selling your own products.)

Cheers,

Alastair Walton