DEEP VS. WIDE EMAIL LISTS (WHICH IS BETTER?)

When looking at email lists I like to classify them as being either “Deep” or “Wide.”

Here’s a quick explanation of what I’m talking about.

(And why this concept is so important for marketers.)

1. Deep Lists

Deep lists primarily refer to a list of buyers. More specifically, I’m talking about a list of buyers who have spent serious money. This can be anything from $297 all the way up to $1997, or more. Another feature of these lists is that they are usually small. For example, you often hear people brag about making money with a list of less than a hundred people. This is how they do it.

When I talk about deep lists I’m also talking about your relationship with that list. People with deep lists have cultivated a relationship with their audience over years and sometimes decades. The audience sees them as a valuable source of information and guidance. They are effectively a guru in their industry.

This means that when you mail high ticket offers…well…the list converts.

And with every offer mailed that relationship grows deeper and deeper.

Then, on the other hand, you have…

2. Wide Lists

A wide list refers to a list of people who have yet to convert. It also refers to people who may have bought low ticket offers. It could also mean you have a list of freebie seekers who will never convert. Another feature of these lists is that you have subscribers who don’t read your emails, or who rarely read them.

Now, this type of list can make you money. For example, if you have 10,000 or more subscribers, and you make a low ticket offer, you’re almost guaranteed to make sales.

Will you make as much as you would with a deep list? Probably not, but it really depends on what type of offer you’re mailing…and how many subscribers you have.

Another problem with wide lists is that these types of buyers can be a pain in the butt. These are the people who feel nothing about asking for a refund and ripping you off. Wide lists can also be a problem because running a list takes money.

So now that you understand this concept here is the real question:

Which type of list is better?

Deep or wide…

The truth is that neither is perfect.

What you really want to do is aim for a mixture of both.

To start with, you want to get as many subscribers as possible and build a wide list.

Really build up that subscriber count and never stop doing this.

Ideally, you want new people subscribing on a daily basis.

You then want to start filtering out people, converting your subscribers, and building a deep list

You do this by mailing as often as possible.

People who aren’t interested in what you’ve got will unsubscribe.

(Believe it or not this is actually a good thing.)

You basically want people to stop wasting your time and shit or get off the pot.

This is basically the art of curating and manicuring your list.

You also want to build and strengthen your relationship with your audience.

This means getting them to know, like, and trust you.

Next, sell a mixture of high and low ticket offers.

High ticket offers also help to get rid of people, especially those who were never going to buy.

That being said, you shouldn’t only sell high ticket offers. It’s a good idea to mix in the occasional low ticket offer. You see, there could be people who like what you’re offering, but who aren’t ready to commit to spending a lot of money with you. These people need a taste of what you’ve got to offer, before they commit to a bigger meal. This is why it’s a good idea to occasionally throw in a low ticket offer.

The bottom line is that you have deep and wide lists.

You goal, as a marketer is to build a mixture of both.

By doing this you’ll maximize conversions…

…and ultimately turn your list into a money making machine.

Alastair Walton

HOW POLITICIANS CAN PERSUADE PEOPLE TO TAKE THE COVID-19 VACCINE

Why are people so resistant to taking the COVID-19 vaccine?

There are a number of reasons for this…

…but the biggest is the inconsistent messages put out by authorities.

You see, I recently read an extremely interesting thread on Twitter.

The person who wrote this thread claims to be involved in high level political messaging.

According to them * this * is what politicians need to do:

1. Stop using guilt

Understand that guilt will never makeanyone take the vaccine. This is because guilt only works when people buy into your premises and moral frameworks. In fact, if people think you’re using guilt as a persuasion tool their views will only harden.

2. Respect people

Normal people are concerned that power will be used against them. If there’s no respect they will expect these abuses of power and they will naturally distrust you. At this point they become impossible to persuade.

3. Understand your audience

The powers that be seem to believe that it’s enough to announce their credentials and expertise. Instead you need to understand your audience and validate their concerns.

4. Build trust

Remember, if people don’t trust you nothing matters. Without trust they see you the same way they see a used car salesman. In this case all of your persuasion attempts will only serve to increase their skepticism of vaccines.

5. Avoid contradictions

The governments messaging has been contradictory, inconsistent, and cynical. A good example of this is politicians who go to restaurants and hair salons without masks…while ordinary people stayed inside and had their businesses shut down.

6. Admit to mistakes

These contradictions are the biggest reason why people are so skeptical. Politicians need to admit this skepticism is somewhat justified. They also need to admit that many mistakes were made.  

These points can be combined into a message which reads something like this.   

“We are sorry. We blew it at the start when we said masks don’t help. It turns out they do. We blew it when we said closing the border was racist. It was actually a good idea. We blew it with the vaccine roll out. We didn’t explain it well…”

Once this is done we move onto the meat of the message…

“We have earned your scorn and distrust. That is our fault. As a gesture of good will, we will not force you to take it…”

Doing this takes abuse of power off the table.

It also opens people up to hearing you out.

Then…

“The vaccines work. They do have side effects, and sometimes they can be severe. I want to say that first, so that you know and can make an informed decision. It is important that you have all the information. Even the downsides…”

This section is powerful because you’re not “fact checking” them.

You’re not treating their concerns as trivial, or acting pretentious, or as if you are a holier-than-thou smarty pants. Nor are you placing yourself above them or condemning them. You’re telling them that they do have concerns that must be addressed.

Next…

“The severe side effects are rare. They exist, but no more than with the flu shot or the malaria vaccine. The vaccine makes most people immune to Covid. About 95% of people who get vaccinated never get Covid. Most vaccines are like this…”

“There is always a small group of vaccinated people who get sick anyway. However, it still means that once you take it you really lower your risk for Covid. There are exceptions, again 95% is not 100%, and there will still be people who get it and pass it on, but it really lowers your risk of getting sick.”

What’s great about this section is that you’re not overselling the vaccine’s effectiveness.

What’s more, you’re not threatening people with another lockdown.

Finally…

“The vaccine isn’t perfect, and will not make Covid go extinct. What it will do is lower the odds of people getting Covid, and if enough people do that we can make most of the Covid go away, and we can lower the risks of Covid for people…”

“Given how prevalent Covid is and that the severe vaccine side effects are no more common that with other vaccines, this is the best and safest way to protect yourself from Covid…”

Again, notice that you’re not talking down to people, threatening them, or shaming them.

This type of messaging can be effective, but only if it’s done consistently…

…and even then it will take time to work.

Feeling convinced?

Cheers,

Alastair Walton

HOW SOCIOPATHS MANIPULATE PEOPLE

Many years ago I knew this guy who was (I’m 100% convinced) a real life sociopath.

This person was unbelievably shady and manipulative.

I could tell you hundreds of stories about the sketchy things he got up to.

The funny thing about this guy is he always, always had a sob story.

These stories were endless.

And after dealing with other possible sociopaths I realized something.

Elicitation of empathy is basically the primary form of manipulation used by these people.

From the get go they will attempt to tug on your heart strings.

There’s always a story they use to make you feel sorry for them.

And once you give in that’s when they pounce.

Another good example of this is homeless people.

Now, I’m not hating on the homeless.

Many of them have genuine problems and cannot fend for themselves.

But what I’m trying to say is that you shouldn’t be naïve.

A lot of these people are absolute predators.

The guy who tells you about his pregnant wife who has to turn tricks so that they can survive…and…who incidentally also has brain cancer…well…there’s a good chance he’s lying.

The bottom line is that you should be careful around people with sob stories.

Always keep your guard up.

Yes they may genuinely need help.

But a lot of the time you’re dealing with a wolf in sheep’s clothing.

Cheers,

Alastair Walton

P.S. The elicitation of empathy is the primary technique used by sociopaths to manipulate people. If you’re dealing with someone who always has a sob story…well…there’s a good chance they may be bona fide sociopath.